Ship Fact Files

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Owner: Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. (White Star Line)

Ship Name:

OCEANIC (I)

Vessel type: Passenger ship

Official No: 63332

Builder:
Harland & Wolff Ltd,
Queen's Island,
Belfast

Yard No: 73

Laid down: n/r

Launched: 27 August 1870

Handed over: 24 February 1871

Port & Date of Registry: Liverpool, 9 February 1871

Managing Owner & Address:n/r 10 Water Street, Liverpool

Description

Number of Decks: 3

Number of Masts: 4

Rigged: Barque

Stern: Round

Build: Clencher

Framework & Description of Vessel: Iron

Number of Bulkheads: 7

Number of water ballast tanks: n/r

Dimensions

Length: 420.0 ft

Breadth: 40.9 ft

Depth: 31.0 ft

Gross Registered Tonnage: 3,707.10

Machinery

Engine Builder: Maudslay, Sons & Field, Westminster Road, Lambeth, London

Engine Type: Compound high and low pressure

Cylinders: 2 X 41; 2 X 78 inches

Stroke: 60 inches

Nominal Horse Power: 600

Boilers

Description: n/r

Number: 12

Iron or Steel: Iron

Pressure when loaded: 64½lbs

Screw: Single

Speed: 14 knots

Signal Letters: J. W. P. F.

Notes

Yard No. 73 was the first steamship ordered by Thomas H. Ismay for his new company, the Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Designed by Edward J. Harland, Oceanic and the rest of her sisters belonging to the ‘Oceanic’ class revolutionized ocean travel. By placing the Cabin (1st class) accommodation amidships, where the movement of the vessel was less, rather than over the stern as tradition dictated, Oceanic marked a turning point in the evolution of the iron steamship. She was originally designed to operate on the Australian service, but at the last moment Ismay decided to enter the fiercely competitive North Atlantic trade and consequently her design was not really suited for this service. Improvements to the design followed and in later years she was placed on the Pacific and proved herself to be one of the most reliable and fastest vessels in the trade between San Francisco and Japan. It is no exaggeration to state that of all the ships that followed her and the modern cruise ships of today, each contain a piece of Oceanic’s DNA - the pioneer of ocean liners.

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