Ship Fact Files

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Owner: Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. (White Star Line)

Ship Name:

OLYMPIC

Vessel type: Passenger ship

Official No: 131346

Builder:
Harland & Wolff Ltd,
Queen's Island, Belfast

Yard No: 400

Laid down: 16 December 1908

Launched: 20 October 1910

Handed over: 29 May 1911

Port & Date of Registry: Liverpool, 25 May 1911

Managing Owner & Address:
Harold Arthur Sanderson,
30 James Street, Liverpool

Description

Number of Decks: 5 & 2 Partial

Number of Masts: 2

Rigged: Schooner

Stern: Elliptical

Build: Clencher

Framework & Description of Vessel: Steel

Number of Bulkheads: 15

Number of water ballast tanks: 17

Dimensions

Length: 852.5 feet

Breadth: 92.5 feet

Depth: 65.33 feet

Gross Registered Tonnage: 45,323.82

Machinery

Engine Builder: Harland & Wolff Ltd, Belfast

Engine Type: 2 X triple expansion inverted vertical direct acting surface condensing, 1 X low pressure turbine

Cylinders: 2 X 54; 2 X 84; 4 X 97 inches

Stroke: 75 inches

Nominal Horse Power: 6,906

Boilers

Description: Cylindrical multi-tubular

Number: 24 double & 5 single ended

Iron or Steel: Steel

Pressure when loaded: 215lbs

Screw: Triple

Speed: 21 knots

Signal Letters: H. S. R. P.

Notes

Of all White Star's vessel's Olympic, with the exception of Titanic, is the Company's most famous ship because of her long and illustrious career. 1905 signalled a new ear in emigrant ship construction. The year marked a North Atlantic record, more than one million emigrants crossed from the Old World to the New. Competition from Cunard and the German lines, attempting to monoplise this growing trade, led the directors of White Star to order the design and construction of the world’s largest liners. The result was the ‘Olympic’ class - three giants that would dominate the passenger trade across the North Atlantic between Southampton and New York. The project was an immense one. No yard was large enough to construct these vessels. The docks at Southampton and New York could not accommodate vessels of this size and almost every aspect of ship management and operation would need to be re-written in order to make the new class a commercial and operational success. On 14 June 1911 Olympic, the new flagship of the White Star Line, departed on her maiden voyage to New York. Her sailing heralded a new ear in big ship construction with all the major lines ordering vessels of similar size. The loss of her sisters by ice and mine did nothing to dent the reputation of Olympic which earned the nickname ‘Old reliable‘. She made her last commercial voyage in March 1935 and was sold for scrap; many of her fine wooden fixtures and fittings were purchased from the shipbreakers and ended up in factory and hotels - a lasting memory to one of the world’s greatest ocean liners.

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