On This Day

21 July

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1883 Lord Line


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A ship, which T. Dixon & Sons had entered into contract with Harland & Wolff to build was taken over by the Irish Shipowners Company. For this their first ship, IRC deemed it right should bear the name of a nobleman who had by his valour and military skill gained such renown and upheld the honour of his native country, and accordingly the stately vessel was named Lord Wolseley; but the nomenclature followed Dixon’s style (with one exception) of naming their vessel beginning with ‘Lord’, the Company eventually styling itself the Lord Line.

The new vessel’s dimensions were: Length 303 feet, breadth 42 feet, 6 inches, with a depth in the hold of 25 feet. One large cargo hold ran the entire length of the vessel, while below there was another hold the combined space able to accommodate upwards of 4,000-tons deadweight. A watertight bulkhead was built in the forward part of the vessel ‘so that, in case of collision, the chances of sinking are minimised’. She was ship-rigged, with four masts, the fore, main and mizen with yards. The vessel was equipped with the latest steam winches essential for the proper working of so huge a craft. The poop aft, contained ‘a very handsomely-decorated saloon, which is very tastefully upholstered in velvet and panelled with mahogany and walnut.’

Off the saloon was the captain's cabin, ‘neatly fitted up with every necessary.’ There was also in the poop state rooms, officers' rooms, a pantry and state-room and quarters for apprentices. The quarters for the crew were in a spacious house erected on deck, between the fore main masts, the house divided into two apartments, each arranged to accommodate sixteen men. There were also separate rooms for the quartermaster and carpenter. In the after part of the deckhouse was a boiler and steam driven winch used for setting and taking in sail, working the pump, weighing the anchors and performing other work on deck.

There was also a large steam-driven pump, used for washing the decks or in an emergency for firefighting; a large diameter pipe running fore and after with separate couplings for fire hoses to be attached. There was also a patent Hawkins' condenser on board, used to supply fresh water should the vessel fit any tine carry emigrants abroad. This condenser capably of distilling about 3,000 gallons of water in twenty-four hours. A hospital was also built on deck to deal with any injured crew or infection cases. Lord Wolselev was commanded by Captain James Dunne (with a crew of forty hands). Dunne, one of the most experienced masters’ sailing out of Belfast, had served twenty-four years with Dixon’s before joining the new Company.

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1897 Derbyshire


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The 6,635-ton passenger ship Derbyshire (Yard No. 314) was launched today for the Bibby Steamship Co., Liverpool.

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1923 Adriatic's crew fined

At Liverpool seventy-eight members of Adriatic’s crew were fined £2 each by a Magistrate after conviction on charges of conspiring to impede the ship’s departure from New York by walking out and demanding a bonus. The dispute among firemen and trimmers began when the men were compelled to work extra hours in consequence of the desertion of twenty-one firemen. Captain Frank E. Beadnell, Commander of Adriatic, was forced to sign an agreement giving the men a bonus of £5 each before they would agree to rejoin the ship. The dispute lead to a thirty minute delay in her scheduled departure time.

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1924 First immigrant visa's

The first immigrants to receive a visa in Great Britain under the United States Immigration Act of 1924 arrived at New York in Celtic. The family, called Ibbetson, from Stoneycroft, Liverpool, were the first of 62,574 persons in Great Britain, Ulster and the Irish Free State who were certified as eligible for entry to the US before 1 July 1925, under the new law.

 

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1936 Lairdswood

The 789-ton coaster Lairdswood (Yard No. 976) on of three sister ships was launched today for Burns & Laird Lines Ltd.