On This Day

1 April

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1911 Three world records together


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White Star’s Olympic (Yard No. 400) the world’s largest liner entered the Thompson Graving Dock, the largest in the world, for the first time today All Fool’s Day. In the background (right) the world’s largest floating crane is being prepared to carry out heavy lifts into Titanic (Yard No. 401). While Olympic was in the Thompson the rest of her hull below the waterline was painted with anti-fouling paint.

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1912 Titanic’s trial voyage postponed


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Due to high winds coming in from the east Titanic’s trial voyage in Belfast Lough scheduled for today was postponed until 2 April.

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1884 Corra Linn

The 833-ton iron cargo ship Corra Linn (WC&C Yard No. 24) was launched at high water today by Workman, Clark & Co. Ltd., from their Spencer Basin shipyard for J. & A. Wylllie, Troon. The christening ceremony was performed by Mrs Wyllie, wife of the owner.

The vessel's dimensions were: Length, 208 feet; Breadth of beam, 29 feet; Depth in hold 14 feet. She was intended for the general cargo trade and built with a long raised quarterdeck, short bridge and topgallant forecastle, all the decks being constructed from iron. The cabin accommodation for the captain and officers was placed aft, under the quarterdeck. The engineers were berthed amidships in a house erected on the quarterdeck abaft the engine casing.

Rigged as a two-masted schooner, the whole arrangement for handling and discharging cargo was worked by steam winches and described as ‘most complete’. She was also provided with Harfield’s patent windlass worked by a messenger chain from the steam winch.

After the launch the vessel was towed around to the finishing berth in the Abercorn Basin to await the stepping of her masts. Afterwards she was towed across to the Clyde where her machinery and boilers were fitted by William Kemp, Glasgow.

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1893 Sarmiento


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The 3,603-ton passenger and cargo ship Sarmiento (Yard No. 265) was launched this morning at high water from the south end of the yard for the Pacific Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., Liverpool. This was the fourth steamer launched from Queen’s Island for PSNC in the past four months. Hugh Brown represented the owners at the launch.

Sarmiento, named after a former president of Argentina, was intended for the Company’s service between Liverpool and the west coast ports of South America. The steel built vessel, rigged as a two masted schooner, was fitted with steam winches for the rapid handling of cargo. Her triple-expansion engines and boilers, also constructed by Harland & Wolff, produced 1,800 horse-power and drove a single propeller cast from manganese bronze.